PLGF CUSTOM BLENDED FERTILIZER


plgf

 

Please use our custom formulated 22-3-3 fertilizer with 6 micro elements blended for your landscape & garden beds.
We also offer ZERO-Phosphorus PLGF for your lawn according to Dane County lawn fertilization mandates.

‘One application feeds the landscape for the entire following growing season.’

One 50-pound bag (feeds about 2,500 –5,000 ft.2)
for current prices go to the HOME page for our latest NEWSLETTER
If desired, installation is available through Landscape Designs, Inc. 

To order call 608-233-4215  or  email: LDi@landscapedesigns.bz 
 


OUR CUSTOM BLENDED ‘Perennial and Landscape Garden Fertilizer’ (PLGF) provides continuous feeding during the growing season. The 6-8 month formulation is based on average 70° F soil temperatures and natural soil bacteria. Cooler temperatures slow the nutrients' release. Since plants are growing VERY slowly during the Winter months, nutrients are available in very small amounts. Three primary and six minor or secondary nutrients provide excellent growth and development throughout the growing season. No other fertilization is generally required, unless new plantings are installed. For best results, and continued plant health and vitality, PLGF should be applied once every Autumn during October through December or immediately following Spring thaw.
PLGF is blended to Landscape Designs, Inc. specifications and consists of THREE PRIMARY NUTRIENTS at 22% Nitrogen, 3% Phosphorus and 3% Potassium. The SIX MINOR NUTRIENTS consist of 0.1% Copper, 2.00% Iron, 0.25% Manganese, 5% Sulfur, 0.5% Magnesium, and 0.1% Zinc.


Application Information

Broadcast PLGF over the beds at 1 to 2 pounds per 100 square feet on all PREVIOUSLY well-fed soils and at 2 to 3 pounds per 100 square feet on all FIRST TIME or nutrient-poor soils.
Two cups equal 1 pound. No need to dig in our PLGF custom blended fertilizer.
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NUTRITION IN THE PERENNIAL GARDEN

Over 100,000 different perennial species and cultivars are hardy in our gardens. Due to this tremendous diversity, it is difficult to delineate the individual nutritional requirements of each specific plant. These requirements vary when plants are in different ecosystems. Small stresses, local soil conditions, temperatures, water supplies and wind all influence a plant’s nutrient use. All perennials, such as Lilacs, Peony, Iris and Daffodils, require the same basic nutrients. Their specific requirements vary due to their stage of development. Tubers, rhizomes, bulbs, flowers, seeds, fruits, pods, and fragrance are being produced at different times in the garden. Since most of us cannot take the time to feed each plant with their individual needs, the best fertilizer would be one that would have a continuous supply of these nutrients so the plants can have them whenever they desire.
The following list of elemental nutrients is an explanation of what they do to accomplish the production of life. Whether the system of release is organic or inorganic makes little difference to the plant. Organic fertilizers are slow release because the mineral contents must be broken down into primary components before the plants can use them. Organic fertilizers are usually more complete in analysis but much lower in total percentage of usable nutrients. Inorganic fertilizers have the nutrients available in a form that the plant can directly use, even through the foliage. Non-organic fertilizers are usually incomplete but generally much higher in total percentage of usable fertilizer. A complete fertilizer contains the three primaries, Nitrogen, Phosphorus and Potassium, N-P-K, nutrients plus up to 10 additional secondary ones. Boron, Copper, Iron, Magnesium, Manganese, Molybdenum, Sulfur and Zinc are generally considered the most desirous of the secondary elements. (In Dane County, our soils and water have more then adequate supplies of Calcium for plant growth.)     
PLANT NUTRIENTS     
NITROGEN (N)
REQUIRED FOR:
Synthesis of amino acids, alkaloids chlorophyll, protoplasm, nucleic acids and enzymes
Good growth and protein content
DEFICIENCY SYMPTOMS:
Younger leaves remain small
Reduced disease tolerance
Older leaves fade to yellow

PHOSPHORUS (P)
REQUIRED FOR:
Formation of DNA, RNA, energy transfer and storage.
Aids in root and shoot formation
Rapid healthy growth
Proper fruiting and seeding
Fat production
DEFICIENCY SYMPTOMS:
Oldest leaves turn dull or dark green with gradual `autumn' reddening
Yellowing and/or bluing mid-veins
Young leaves remain very small
Necrosis begins at leaf tip and progresses to the base
Shortened internodes

POTASSIUM (K)
REQUIRED FOR:
Translocation of sugars
Starch formation
Increased size and quality of fruit and grains
Cell membranes and stomatal changes
Disease and chill resistance
Root growth and xylem formation
DEFICIENCY SYMPTOMS:
Weak stems
Old leaves turn brown as tip and side necrosis curls the leaf upwards and inwards
Bending and lodging

MAGNESIUM (Mg)
REQUIRED FOR:
Chlorophyll formation
Catalyst for plant growth enzymes
Prevention of `rattiness'
DEFICIENCY SYMPTOMS:
Oldest leaves develop a bronze yellow chlorosis which progresses inward and downward like a "V" until the leaf withers
Inter-venial yellowing on new leaves
Leaves curl upward along margins

CALCIUM (Ca)
REQUIRED FOR:
Cell wall formation
Enzyme catalyst
New cell production
Maintaining a balance between Mg & K
Neutralizing harmful by products
Preventing tips from dying
DEFICIENCY SYMPTOMS:
Older leaves become thick & brittle
Premature shedding of blossoms and buds
Weak stems

SULFUR (S)
REQUIRED FOR:
Protein components
Volatile plant oils/scents
Fruit and seed maturity
Vitamin B1
DEFICIENCY SYMPTOMS:
(Uncommon)
Youngest leaves turn pale green then gradually yellow and remain small.

IRON (Fe)
REQUIRED FOR:
Chlorophyll formation
Activation of respiration
Photosynthesis
Nitrogen fixation
DEFICIENCY SYMPTOMS:
New leaves with inter-venial chlorosis
Veins remain small
New leaves may turn creamy in color, remain small and fall off.

MANGANESE (Mn)

REQUIRED FOR:
Chlorophyll formation with Iron
Activator of growth enzymes
Formation of 02 in photosynthesis
DEFICIENCY SYMPTOMS:
Similar to Iron

COPPER (Cu)
REQUIRED FOR:
Activating enzymes
Vitamin A synthesis
Protein synthesis
Pigments
Regulation of soil nitrogen
High concentration of seeds
DEFICIENCY SYMPTOMS:
Young leaves remain small and wilt
Stunted growth
Poor pigmentation
Die-back in fruit Hard fruits
Lack of vegetables

BORON (B)
REQUIRED FOR:
Active growing tissue differentiation
Geotropic responses
Regulation of carbohydrate metabolism
DEFICIENCY SYMPTOMS:
Short thick stems
Small rigid leaves
Sunken necrotic spots and nodes
New stems die-back and petiole and edges of leaves crack
"Witches Broom" development

ZINC (Zn)
REQUIRED FOR:
Enzyme constituents
Controlling the synthesis of some growth regulators
Chlorophyll formation
Respiration
Nitrogen metabolism
DEFICIENCY SYMPTOMS:
The new leaves form rosettes
Leaf size reduction
Fruit size reduction
Inter-venial chlorosis
Twig die-back

MOLYBDENUM (Mb)
REQUIRED FOR:
Transformation of nitrates into amino acids
Nitrogen fixation in legumes
DEFICIENCY SYMPTOMS:
Old leaves yellow followed by cupping and marginal scorching
Stunting

CHLORINE (Ch)

REQUIRED FOR:
Red, blue and violet pigments
Maturation
Photosynthesis
Water retention in cells
Catalyst in O2 production
DEFICIENCY SYMPTOMS:
Marginal necrosis

FLUORINE (Fl)
DEFICIENCY SYMPTOMS:
Marginal burning on old leaves tips
COBALT (Co)
REQUIRED FOR:
Nitrogen fixation in root nodules
Vitamin B12
SODIUM (Na)
REQUIRED FOR:
Part of the manner in which K is used

 

Further information may be found at http://soil5813.okstate.edu/Nutrient_cyles_text.htm

 
 
 
 

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